Strawberry Avocado Spinach Salad

I absolutely love this salad and I hope that you do too!

Ingredients:

6 cups of spinach (washed and dried)–or mixed greens if you prefer

1-2 avocados, cubed

1/3 cup organic goat cheese crumbles

3 large strawberries, sliced (about 3/4 cup)

Optional: 1/4 cup toasted walnuts or pecans

Dressing:

1/2 cup blood orange infused olive oil and 1/4 cup blackberry balsamic vinegar OR I’ve made a lovely dressing of 1/2 cup olive oil, 2 T lime juice, 3 T dijon mustard, 1 tsp of Italian seasoning, and either 2 T of honey or 1-2 T powdered Lakanto (this is a great option for reducing sugar). Salt and pepper to taste.

How to:

Place all salad ingredients in a large bowl. Mix the dressing in a bowl or mug and add before serving, mixing well.

Enjoy!

5 Easy Tips for Better Blood Sugar

Preventing your blood sugar from spiking is something you want to do if you’re interested in slowing cell aging, maintaining a healthy weight, reducing inflammation, having sustainable energy/mood/hormonal balance, and greatly reducing your risk of chronic diseases.
There are some really easy things that you can do that can make a significant improvement.

Eat Your Veggies First (and add some vinegar)

In her book The Glucose Goddess Method, French biochemist Jessie Inchauspé describes how eating veggies before carbs/sweets can reduce glucose spikes by up to 73%! That’s Tip #1.

From her website, gucosegoddess.com:


And having a tablespoon of vinegar before meals can reduce glucose spikes by up to 30%! Any type of vinegar works (I recommend apple cider vinegar and avoiding balsamics before meals–and it’s best to dilute it with some water and drink through a straw or take it like a shot to protect your tooth enamel; if you are having a salad or veggies with a dressing with vinegar, that’s a great option!). Now, if you have an H. pylori overgrowth, GERD, heartburn or issues with your esophagus, it’s best to check with your practitioner to make sure this tip is safe for you. That’s Tip #2.
One of the worst things you can do for your blood sugar is to have carbs all by themselves–combining them with protein/fat helps reduce spikes as well. That’s Tip #3.

Move Your Body After You Eat

Moving your body around for 10 mins (walking, stretching, nothing too strenuous) after you eat lowers glucose and insulin by helping your muscles to take up extra glucose–That’s Tip #4.


Eat Organic Food

I attended a thorough summit on detoxification this winter and one of the gems shared was that switching to organic foods and decreasing exposure to the pesticide glyphosate has been shown to decrease glucose readings in study participants. I especially recommend avoiding non-organic sources of The Dirty Dozen produce since they have the highest concentrations–That’s Tip #5.

I hope that this information inspires you to add these great tips into your life!

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. Through testing and coaching, I can help you to discover where your best health has been hiding.

If you’re ready to feel your best right away, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Italian Chopped Salad

A friend of mine brought this salad over for a potluck and we absolutely loved it! The recipe below has some modifications that I prefer. I recommend using organic ingredients whenever possible.

Ingredients for Salad:

1 head of romaine lettuce, cleaned and cut into bite sizes

1 small red onion, finely sliced

1/2 lb provolone or mozzarella cheese, cut into small cubes (my friend prefers smoked gouda)

1 15-oz can of chickpeas (I love Eden Organics)

1/4-1/2 lb salami, cut into bite sized pieces

3/4 lb cherry tomatoes (you can leave them whole or slice in half)

4 medium pepperoncinis, cut into bite sized pieces

Dressing:

4 cloves garlic, minced

1-2 T dried oregano

2 tsps salt

2 T lemon juice

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 tsp black pepper

How to:

There’s a lot of chopping, so put on some good music or a podcast before you get started.

Combine all the salad ingredients in a large bowl and then mix up the dressing in a separate bowl. Combine just before serving and mix really well. This is a large salad and it will taste good as leftovers for a couple of days, but it is best if you are feeding a larger group (6 people or so). Enjoy!

Oil Pulling with Castor Oil (for oral health)

The health of your mouth greatly effects the rest of your body and vice versa. Today I want to focus on your oral biome (the bacterial makeup of your mouth) and some ways that you can elevate your oral health, which will benefit your whole body.
First of all, oil pulling is a centuries old Ayurvedic practice that promotes reducing toxins in the mouth by swishing oil around the mouth for several minutes and then spitting it out (step by step guide below).


Improving the bacterial balance in your mouth supports both your upstream health and your downstream health: It’s kinda gross to think about, but we swallow gallons of saliva throughout the day. Your whole microbiome benefits by improving the bugs that are hanging out in your mouth!

Benefits of Oil Pulling

  • Whitens teeth
  • Freshens breath
  • improves the balance of healthy bacteria versus unfriendly flora which contributes to tooth decay and gum disease
  • Breaks down biofilm (protective layer that bacteria creates to stop you from killing it)–
    castor oil is one of the few oils that can break down harmful biofilm according to periodontal medicine studies
  • Encourages healthy gums

Step by Step Guide

  1. Pour up to 1 tbsp of oil onto a spoon. I recommend a high quality castor oil (in glass bottle vs plastic) since it gets the job done efficiently (2 minutes versus the 20 mins that are recommended for coconut or sesame oil).
  2. Swish the oil around your mouth well, pulling it through your teeth,  for 1-2 minutes.
  3. Spit the oil out in the trash when you’re done (will be frothy and white).
  4. Brush your teeth and rinse out your mouth thoroughly.


I hope that this information is helpful to you. It’s a pretty easy habit to piggyback onto your oral health routine (you can do it while you get your toothbrush ready, or pick out your clothes for the day, etc) with clear benefits.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. Through testing and coaching, I can help you to discover where your best health has been hiding.

If you’re ready to take your health to the next level, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Colonoscopy Prep Alternatives (Microbiome Friendly)

Recently I read an article about how colon cancer is on the rise in Americans under age 55. While the exact causes are unknown, unhealthy diets, alcohol intake, and sedentary lifestyles are believed to contribute.
Most of my newsletters focus on actions you can take to improve your diet and lifestyle so today I thought I’d share some thoughts on how to support your gut health while using early detection screenings.


There are 4 screening tests recommended by doctors to find polyps and/or colorectal cancer: stool tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy–the one most everyone has heard of, and CT Colonography or virtual colonoscopy.
Stool tests look for abnormal DNA and blood in your stool; flexible sigmoidoscopy uses a thin lighted tube to check for polyps in the rectum and lower third of the colon; colonoscopy uses a longer lighted tube to check for polyps inside the rectum and entire colon; and a virtual colonoscopy uses X-rays and computers to produce images of the entire colon. Here’s the pros and cons of each.
If polyps or abnormal DNA is detected, then the current recommendations are to get a colonoscopy and have the polyps removed and tested to see if they are cancerous or not.
 

Prepping For Colonoscopy

Most of you are aware that prior to getting a colonoscopy, there is prepping that must be done to clear out the colon (hours-long process of drinking a salty solution followed by a lot of time on the toilet.
There are some easier alternatives that involve tablets versus the high-volume drink; split dosing of the high-volume drink; low-volume drink versions; and flavor mixes that can be added to these drinks to improve the flavor. Here is an explanation of each.
Some chemical free alternatives include a magnesium citrate protocol or colon hydrotherapy,
In any case, clearing out your bowels will substantially change your gut microbiota and it takes about 14 days for most people’s bacterial balance to recover to baseline.
 

3 Tips To Help Your Microbiome Bounce Back

There are some strategies to help your friendly flora build back after a colonoscopy: your nutrition, stress level, and sleep are all going to influence those 400 or so strains of bacteria that live in your colon and support your immune system, digestion, and production of certain vitamins (K, B2, and B12). Aside from keeping your stress down, getting enough rest, and eating a healthy diet, here are 3 specific tips for you:

  1. Right after your colonoscopy, go for easily digestible foods such as pureed soups or slow cooked foods that also help you to rehydrate. Opt for nutrient dense options–clean proteins and fiber rich veggies. This is good for your body all the time, not just after a colonoscopy!
  2. I recommend eating any prebiotic foods that agree with your system because prebiotics feed your healthy flora and will help them bounce back more quickly. Examples are chicory, sunchokes (Jerusalem artichokes), leeks, garlic, psyllium, and artichokes. If you tolerate raw asparagus, raw leeks, and raw dandelion greens, those are high in prebiotics. Listen to your body. If you experience a lot of gas when you eat prebiotic foods, you may need to back off on the quantity and allow your body to adjust.
  3. Probiotic foods are also helpful for building your friendly flora back. Yogurt, kefir, and raw dairy are popular options but if dairy doesn’t work for you, there are dairy free options such as coconut yogurt or kefir or water kefir. Other great non-dairy probiotic foods are fermented vegetables (green beans, kimchi, sauerkraut, fermented pickles), natto, miso, tempeh, kvass, and kombucha.
     

I hope that this information is helpful for you to be a more confident advocate for yourself in choosing the right screening test as well as knowing some great strategies to help your friendly gut flora bounce back if you get a colonoscopy.

It is my passion to work with people like you who want to sustain or regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Anti-inflammatory Foods & Hormonal Balance

Today we are going to look at how focusing on nourishing your body with anti-inflammatory foods will help you develop a healthy baseline…and that’s an essential ingredient for hormone balance for both men and women! There’s some great research on the rise about how creating an anti-inflammatory diet is especially useful for women in perimenopause and post menopause for overall hormone balance and weight management. Eating the right foods in the proper portions and combinations is the foundation for creating your best health.

What Is An Anti-inflammatory Diet?

This is kind of a trick question. I would love to be able to honestly tell you that there is an agreed upon anti-inflammatory diet that works for EVERYONE, but that just isn’t the case. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to nutrition (or fitness, or pretty much anything health related for that matter).
The truth is that there are some great guidelines, and I’m going to share those with you, but that customizing your diet is something I always recommend. When I’m working with clients, this is one of the very first things we do together and testing is incredibly helpful and saves time/energy.
What makes establishing the right diet even trickier is that our needs change over time–as we age, experience stressful life events, interact with toxins,  experience changes in our gut microbiome and hormones, well, the foods and/or combinations of foods that used to feel good to us may start to create problems. It will always be important to pay attention to your nutrition and self-care. It will always be important to listen to your body’s feedback.
So, having said that, let’s look at some of the pillars of an anti-inflammatory diet.

Top Anti-inflammatory Foods

  1. Green leafies–loaded with polyphenols, antioxidants, and fiber which help your body to eliminate inflammatory toxins and improve cardiovascular health. If you struggle to digest raw greens, consider lightly cooking.
  2. Colorful veggies–loaded with polyphenols, antioxidants, and fiber which help your body to eliminate inflammatory toxins. If you struggle to digest raw veggies, I suggest lightly cooking them, chew extra well, and consider reaching out to investigate your gut health.
  3. Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, sardines, and herring are loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids which help balance the inflammatory process.
  4. Clean protein sources–this can include grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, wild game, legumes, and even dairy (true, dairy is a commonly reactive food but not everyone needs to avoid it. When choosing dairy, go for organic, grass-fed and raw. A2 sources are generally less inflammatory–you can find A2 cow dairy; goat and sheep dairy is A2.)
  5. Nuts and seeds–sprouted forms are the best, most digestible.
  6. Olive oil–organic & cold pressed, extra virgin, and in dark glass bottles are best. Avocado oil and coconut oil are also good options.
  7. Green and herbal teas. Quality matters, here’s a guide.
  8. Herbs and spices including clove, cinnamon, turmeric, garlic, oregano, rosemary, basil, black pepper, cayenne, and ginger are loaded with cell-protecting antioxidants.
  9. Dark chocolate and cacao–unsweetened is ideal or using low amounts of healthy sweeteners such as monk fruit, stevia, erythritol, or allulose. Cacao is loaded with polyphenols which provide antioxidant protection. Again and always, quality matters.
  10. Fresh or frozen fruit like strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, pomegranate, apples, and stone fruit are high in nutrients, fiber and antioxidants. Too much fruit can lead to high blood sugar which has the opposite effect. Signs that you are eating a good balance are that you feel full and satisfied, weight is balanced, energy is stable, and if you test your blood sugar, your fasting levels are 70-89 and staying below 120 1-2 hrs after meals.

Customize & Listen To Your Body

Even foods that look great “on paper” can be inflammatory as I’ve mentioned. I’ve had clients who had strong food sensitivities to salmon, lettuce, lemon, apples, cinnamon, turmeric, garlic…well pretty much everything that I just shared that is considered anti-inflammatory!
You’ve got to listen to your body. If you are taking the best care of yourself that you know how to and eating an anti-inflammatory diet but are still having recurring symptoms, then that’s a waving red flag that something needs customizing. Decades ago, this is exactly what happened with me in my own healing journey. It turns out that I had some gut and hormonal things that needed dialing in–until I did that, my immune system was reacting strongly to almost 40 “healthy” anti-inflammatory foods! Thankfully, once I addressed my gut and hormonal imbalances, I was able to add back in every single one of those foods that I’d previously had an adverse reaction to.
As this illustrates, our bodies are pretty incredible at healing. Healthy is our default setting, but we do need to clear the path if the evidence is telling us (through persistent symptoms) that something is preventing our default setting from fully functioning.

I hope that this information empowers you to take a fresh look at your diet and feel inspired to include more anti-inflammatory foods that make you feel good into your daily routine.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. Through testing and coaching, I can help you to discover where your best health has been hiding.

I’ve got 2 webinars coming up soon where I’ll be sharing more tips on how to manage inflammation and take your health to the next level (links on the right under “Upcoming Events”).

If you’re ready to feel your best right away, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

The Key to Better Energy: Unlocking the Thyroid-Adrenal Connection

Living with low or inconsistent energy sucks! If you know me, you might be asking, “how the heck would you know?!” because I tend to have a high level of steady energy (now)…but that wasn’t always the case. I struggled with my health in my teens and 20’s…an age range where that usually isn’t the case. My symptoms are what urged me to become the practitioner I am today. And today, I want to share an important connection with you that I consider to be the key to better energy.

In the past I’ve written about the connection between your thyroid and adrenal glands in connection with your gut, but today I want to share with you how closely tied your thyroid and adrenal glands are connected and how you can use this information to support your energy and wellbeing at the root level.
 

Your Adrenals & Thyroid

Your adrenal glands are little walnut-sized glands that sit atop your kidneys and are one of the most overworked and under appreciated parts of your body. Our adrenals play many roles in our health. A big one is making sure you have steady energy throughout the day.
The adrenal glands have two main components, the cortex and medulla, that perform such diverse functions that some scientists consider them to be two separate glands.

The adrenal medulla synthesizes epinephrine and norepinephrine, allowing your body to respond to stress. The adrenal cortex synthesizes important hormones such as cortisol, aldosterone and androgens. Cortisol is catabolic, meaning it breaks down tissue (like muscle) and high cortisol levels raise blood sugar, which raise insulin–all to our detriment, making us prone to storing fat rather than losing it. Weight gain in the midsection that is resistant to weight loss is a classic indication of someone under chronic stress.

DHEA is a key hormone from which testosterone and the estrogens are made. It mitigates some of the negative affects from high cortisol and it also promotes the growth and repair of tissue (especially muscle). When you’re in a chronic state of stress, the demand for cortisol creates an imbalance in your DHEA. DHEA levels decline and the whole hormone system begins to break down. And you feel it! Low or inconsistent energy, appetite imbalance, poor sleep, weight gain (especially in the midsection), and often digestive issues are all connected to this imbalance.

What’s more is that when cortisol levels are high, they interfere with the functioning of your thyroid gland.

What is the thyroid & what’s it do?

The thyroid gland is a 2-inch long butterfly-shaped gland located in the middle of the lower neck. Despite its small size, it produces hormones that affect every cell, tissue, and organ of the body. These hormones control metabolism–the chemical processes in your body that break down what you eat to make energy.


I will give you a simple explanation of how thyroid hormones affect your metabolism. Your thyroid gland actually produces three hormones: Thyroxine (T4), Triiodothyronine (T3), and Calcitonin. We will not be focusing on Calcitonin, but this hormone is responsible for the formation of bones. T4 and T3, on the other hand, are what most people call the “thyroid hormones,” which are manufactured by the thyroid gland using the building blocks iodine (a trace mineral) and tyrosine (an amino acid).

T4 and T3 cannot be released to the bloodstream unless there is a stimulus from the brain, particularly from the pituitary gland–that pea-sized body connected to the base of the brain, the major endocrine gland responsible for your body’s growth and development as well as the functioning of other glands such as the thyroid. So this pituitary gland will release a hormone called Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) which tells the thyroid gland to release thyroid hormones into your circulation. Once they’re out, they act on every cell in your body to increase cellular activity, converting food into energy–this is metabolism. These hormones can affect how fast your heart beats, how deep your breath goes, your energy level, your digestion, and whether you gain or lose weight.

Now here’s the kicker: “Cortisol functions in a negative feedback loop with the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Once it enters your bloodstream, its presence signals to your hypothalamus and pituitary gland to slow down so that they don’t trigger any additional stress hormones. These organs also regulate thyroid hormone production, so that slows down as well,” Dr. Amy Myers.
And there’s more: your immune and inflammatory response is affected by the stress response and this makes your thyroid receptors less sensitive to your thyroid hormones. This can be a real problem! Your body isn’t going to be responding to the thyroid hormones you’re making and if you are taking thyroid medication, this can interfere with the ability of the medication to work effectively.
And lastly, chronic stress/prolonged cortisol imbalance also make it so the thyroid hormones you make become bound to TBG (thyroid-binding globulin) and therefore unavailable to you (this is via excess cortisol causing excess estrogen which increases TBG).
So in multiple ways, elevated cortisol can reduce TSH as well as T4 and T3 production, as well as get in the way of those thyroid hormones working effectively in your body–essentially chronic stress and chronically imbalanced adrenal hormones interfere with your thyroid’s ability to do its job!

10 Great Ways to Support Your Adrenals & Thyroid

Stress is inevitable. Life can really seem like a juggling act! Stress management therefore is all about reducing the amount of objects you are juggling at any one time as well as hitting the pause button so that your system gets the message that it doesn’t need to be on red-alert. Because essentially, if your body thinks that it is in danger, it’s going to make changes to protect you in the moment…but that will take a toll on you in the long-run.

Simple things like sitting down to eat, not eating on the run, chewing food thoroughly, help your system hit the pause button.
Breathing in through your nose, taking deeper breaths, are amazing as well.

And then there are all of the diet and lifestyle factors that are going to help you reduce the amounts of things you are juggling. Here are some factors that you can get dialed in that will positively impact your adrenals, thyroid and your energy!

  1. Get plenty of sleep. Your body needs 7-8 hours of sleep each night and possibly even more if you are dealing with thyroid and adrenal imbalance (click here for guidelines and tips).
  2. Eat a healthy diet of high quality, whole foods (tips here) and avoid or minimize caffeine, sugar, and alcohol.
  3. Stay hydrated with clean/filtered water and avoid plastic water bottles (and plastic in general as they are a known hormonal disruptor).
  4. Support your microbiome. Current research shows that lactobacillus and bifidobacterium-based probiotics play a role in supporting thyroid function and reducing thyroid antibodies (when your own body attacks your thyroid). Click here for more tips.
  5. Emotional self-regulation techniques like HeartMath are extremely effective. So is meditation, yoga, breathing techniques, movement, journaling, therapy and more.
  6. Get outside in nature whenever possible. Natural light helps support the proper balance of your hormones.
  7. Move your body throughout the day. If you are struggling with low energy, I don’t recommend hard exercise, but moving your body will actually help balance your energy levels. If possible, also incorporate some exercise, but really listen to your body. Here are some good tips and reminders.
  8. Set boundaries, delegate when possible, and don’t overextend yourself. Here are some tips.
  9. Consider HIDDEN sources of stress (hormonal, immune, detoxification (elimination of toxins both in and out of your body), digestion (including dietary food sensitivities), environmental & emotional, and neurotransmitter balance). Structural/musculoskeletal imbalance doesn’t fit my acronym for HIDDEN stress, but I encourage you to explore your alignment as a possible source of stress and energy drain (customizing my approach to factor in for my scoliosis and leg length discrepancy was/is a big deal in my healing & self-care).
  10. Don’t guess: TEST! As you can see, there are plenty of general ways that you can support your body to rebalance and be healthy. However, if you’ve been at this for awhile, you will get a lot of value out of testing and targeting your approach to your specific needs.

I hope that this information empowers you towards the diet and lifestyle changes that can help you feel better and have sustained energy.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Spicy Nuts

  1.  Soak your favorite nuts in a glass bowl with filtered water and a dash of sea salt (water should be an inch or two above nuts) for 7 hours or overnight.
  2. Drain nuts in strainer for 5 minutes.
  3. Pre-heat oven on lowest setting, between 170-225 degrees.
  4. Spread nuts evenly on cookie sheets, preferably ceramic or glass rather than teflon. Try to prevent lots of overlap for faster cooking time.
  5. Add your favorite spices: plain salt, spicy blend (cayenne pepper, thyme, rosemary), or sweet spicy (cinnamon, nutmeg, coriander or cardamom) and bake for 8-12 hrs. They’re done when they are crunchy and crispy (not chewy at all).

Understanding Disease Development: The Role of the Cell Danger Response

Your body was designed to be healthy. And sometimes, the innate mechanisms that are designed to protect us become the #1 obstacle.
Have you heard about the cell danger response (CDR)? It’s a natural process, by which your cells protect and defend themselves against all sorts of threats: toxins, infections, environmental stressors, trauma (both physical and psychological), that gets stuck in a vicious loop.
The CDR is considered to be linked to about a hundred of the most common diseases, including autoimmunity, diabetes (types 1, 2 and 3), POTS, fibromyalgia, heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, and more.

One of the most important things for you to understand about why this concept is important is that your cells have 2 modes: make energy…OR protect and defend. Which means that in order to thrive, your body can’t think you are stuck in survival mode. If your cell danger response trigger is flipped on, you will not feel great. In fact, you might feel really, really lousy. For a detailed look at the 3 levels of the CDR, check out this article.

Common CDR Triggers & Symptoms

Common symptoms with CDR include fatigue, depression, chronic pain, digestive issues, brain fog, inflammation, and rashes.

4 Steps For Shutting Off the CDR

  • Step 1: Remove as many stressors as possible. This is where we take a big picture view of lifestyle, diet, sleep, hydration, breathing and movement patterns, daily habits, mental emotional health and stress management, environmental factors (such as air quality, toxins in home and/or at work, heavy metal exposure and dental history), as well as explore things like chronic infections, imbalanced gut health, imbalanced blood sugar, chronic mold exposure (past or present), etc.
  • Step 2: Bring in some tools to support and regulate your nervous system regulation: guided meditations (HeartMathCalmHeadspace), Apollo Neuro, vagus nerve stimulation or improving vagal toneBrainTapHemi-sync, and various neurofeedback devices like HeartMath’s Inner Balance Coherence Plus.
  • Step 3: Address issues in your tissues! Our bodies hold stress, tension, and trauma. Helpful tools for releasing and healing include are TREtai chi, qi gong, Yoga NidraCraniosacral TherapySomatic Therapy, dancing, all kinds of massage therapy, and body shaking throughout the day (shake it off!).
  • Step 4: Wiring new thoughts, habits, and ways of engaging with stress or challenges. This can be done via books, podcasts, practitioners and coaches such as myself, therapists, etc. to support the learning and embodying of being healthy and identifying as someone who is healthy and resilient. Additionally, there are tools that can be woven in once the first 3 steps are progressing well that can support resilience-building and hormesis (challenges that strengthen our ability to handle stress in a healthy way) such as cold therapy, sauna, various types of fasting, various breathing techniques, high-intensity interval training, and mental challenges like crosswords and puzzles.

I hope that this information is helpful to you, especially if you or someone you know is feeling stuck in your healing journey.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

What’s Your Healthspan?

Do you want to feel vibrant, healthy, independent, and strong for as much of your life as possible?
Your healthspan is the length of your life spent in good health versus your life span which is your total years lived.

Focus on Quality of Life

When you focus on living quality years, this naturally attracts you toward healthier habits. Think about the cumulative effect of your current habits. It’s so easy to rationalize unhealthy habits one day to the next (we say things like “Today was hard, I’ll eat better tomorrow”), but when you set your intention to living a life of QUALITY, that expanded viewpoint allows you to see that rationalizing comes at an extremely high cost.
As we age (and we are all aging), our bodies become less forgiving. Dr. Peter Attia discusses a concept called backcasting which essentially describes that if we want to be strong, healthy and functional in our older years, we must invest in it early on. And it really does work like an investment. Every workout you do, healthy meal you eat, and tool that you use to support your mental health helps you to have improved likelihood of better quality of life throughout your life. The opposite is also true: we pay dearly for poor habits. They always catch up with us.

5 Tools For Improving Your Healthspan

  1. Eat a high quality diet with sufficient protein, fiber, and nutrients. Keeping your blood sugar stable is incredibly important for decreasing disease risk, keeping your energy levels up, and your body composition healthy. Focus on delicious AND nutritious!
  2. Manage your stress and support your mental emotional health. Emotional self-regulation techniques like HeartMath are extremely effective. So is meditation, yoga, breathing techniques, movement, journaling, time in nature, therapy and more.
  3. Move your body often AND exercise. Building muscle and maintaining muscle is VITAL to being able to continue to function independently as we age, maintain good balance, and prevent falling/injuries. 
  4. Get enough quality sleep, 7-8 hrs/night.
  5. Quality connections with others–social support is essential. Spend time either one-on-one or in groups of people that you feel supported by, cared about, and aligned with. Bonus is to do some socializing outside and physically active!

I hope that this information empowers you towards the diet and lifestyle changes that can add quality and years to your life.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you need or want help improving your healthspan, that is what I do! Don’t waste another second–Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca