The Amazing Health Benefits of Hyaluronic Acid

The Amazing Health Benefits of Hyaluronic Acid

Otherwise known as hyaluronan or hyaluronate, hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance in the body called a glycosaminoglycan. Characterized as gooey and slippery, this substance can be found all throughout the body, particularly in the eyes, joints, and skin. Naturally, it is highly concentrated in body areas where it helps retain collagen, increase moisture, and provide elasticity and flexibility. When we are younger, we tend to produce higher levels ofhyaluronic acid. As we age, production reduces considerably.

If the name rings a bell, it’s because hyaluronic acid can be found in anti-aging skin serums and other healthcare products. It is, in fact, dermatologically recommended to improve skin texture and appearance. Eye drops, wrinkle creams, lip balms, cold sore treatments, and joint-supporting formulas may contain hyaluronan.

Hyaluronic acid was originally taken from the rooster comb. This process is still done now, but hyaluronic acid can already be derived through a fermentation process in the laboratory. It is sold either in liquid, powder, or capsule form. Since the liquid form may contains preservatives or alcohol, I recommend checking the label to help you pick the best option for yourself.

Over the years, research has supported that hyaluronic acid has great water retention capacity. That’s why it functions to hydrate the body and lubricate the joints. It is also part of the fluid between cells (extracellular fluid) where tissue repair occurs.

Health Benefits of Hyaluronic Acid (HA)

Joint lubrication – hyaluronic acid by nature is slippery; thus, it helps body parts where it is present to move smoothly. Thus it is found in all bones, connecting tissues, joints, tendons, and cartilage all over the body. It provides resistance to wear and tear and serves as a cushion for bones in the joints.

Hydration — a quarter teaspoon of hyaluronic acid holds approximately one and a half gallons of water! Hence, it is used as an ingredient in moisturizing creams and lotions. Its ability to prevent water loss naturally reduces the signs of aging due to exposure to sunlight, skin dryness, and flakiness.

Dry eye treatment — Doctors also use lubricating hyaluronic acid formulas to treat eye conditions such as cataracts.

Gut health — Naturally occurring hyaluronic acid (produced by your body or found in chicken collagen) are larger particles than synthetic forms and function in the gut to prevent inflammation and/or help you heal from inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. Natural hyaluronic acid encourages the healing process in the gut and may prevent the development of a leaky gut. Important to note here that overuse of synthetic hyaluronic acid (isolated particles) can be inflammatory to the gut–they are smaller particles than natural ones and can potentially cause GI inflammation.

Increase your hyaluronic acid naturally

Natural forms of HA are found in bone broth (bone broth protein powder) and collagen. Kale, oranges, tofu and edamame, sweet potatoes, and almonds are rich in nutrients that support HA production.


I hope that this newsletter was helpful to you! It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully to regain your health and experience more freedom in your body.

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

4 Dieting Myths Busted

If you are trying to achieve or maintain your ideal weight, you might fall victim to some of the many dieting myths that are rampant in mainstream media. Today, let’s look at and bust 4 of the most common dieting myths together.

  1. Carbs are fattening – Not at all, if you eat the right types and amounts of carbohydrates. Carbs include all vegetables, fruits, grain, beans and legumes (which also have protein but are high in starchy carbs and fiber), and of course processed foods derived from these natural forms of carbs (this is where most of us get into imbalance quite quickly). In their natural form, carbohydrate foods are a source of energy, minerals like iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and manganese, and B vitamins. Carbs also contain fiber which supports digestion, diversity of your gut microbes, and helps you feel fuller for longer. So carbs aren’t inherently fattening and supply a lot of health building elements. However, carbs can be unhealthy if you rely primarily on processed versions of the whole foods (aka pasta, bread, cereal, pastries, etc) that are pretty much only supplying starch, a little fiber and a sliver of nutrients. Carbs are also fattening if they lead to overeating. Overeating anything is going to lead to increased fat tissue! But certain foods are much easier to overeat than others, certain combos of food are easier to overeat (high starch + high fat, for example), and certain metabolisms respond to higher carb consumption by craving more and more carbs or more food in general…which of course will lead to extra body fat. So, these are the real reasons why being mindful of the types and quantities of carbs, rather than vilifying ALL carbs, will help you to achieve or maintain your ideal weight.
  2. Skipping meals helps – Skipping meals is not something I recommend as a general rule. Not eating when you aren’t hungry, however is. We live in a very food-focused society. We encourage snacking between meals and high-calorie drinks…our bodies are overloaded! Rather than skipping meals to speed up weight loss (which is not sustainable over time and your metabolism will slow down to counteract this if you aren’t taking in enough nutrients or calories), focus your efforts on eating high-quality, nutrient-dense meals with protein, fiber and produce (chicken with broccoli, salmon and asparagus, tofu and veggie stir fry) that will satisfy your appetite so you don’t reach for more calories from foods or drinks throughout the day–this will help you build gut health, support a healthy weight, and a healthy metabolism. 
  3. Low-fat foods are healthy – Because the label says it’s low fat doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Definitely read the nutritional facts of any product because sometimes, the fats in low-fat foods are replaced with more sugar or salt to help preserve the original flavor of the product and are NOT healthy. Fats are incredibly important for your hormone production, sleep, sex drive, cholesterol balance, absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K…and fats help you feel satisfied from your meal. As I mentioned earlier, high fat combined with high starch is a brutal combo that tricks your brain into wanting to eat a lot more than is healthy…but skimping on healthy fats like nuts, avocados, coconut, olives, eggs, organic butter, fish and pastured animal protein…that’s not something I advise. These foods have a lot of health benefits and going too low-fat will lead to health problems for most people.
  4. Intense exercise is the only way to lose weight – Intense or vigorous exercise is not the only way but a way to support weight loss if combined with proper calorie intake. Also, vigorous exercises are not for everyone, especially if you have certain medical conditions (high blood pressure, COPD, certain types of arthritis or chronic fatigue, for example). You may opt for moderate exercises instead, such as walking, biking, dancing, and strength training.

I hope that this newsletter was helpful to you! It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Oat Bran vs Oatmeal: Which is Healthier?

Oat Bran vs Oatmeal: Which is Healthier?

I’m excited to talk about this topic with you today, but before we dig in, I want to make sure that you are aware of a free webinar I am giving next week with Park Avenue Fitness on inflammation. You can view the details and sign up free here.
Okay so let’s talk about oats! Oats, which are formally named Avena sativa, are a gluten-free whole grain from the Poaceae grass family of plants. Well technically, all grains have gluten (a storage protein), but the gluten that everyone talks about as harmful is found in wheat, rye, barley and anything cross-contaminated with these.
While oats have nutritional value, there are a few reasons why oats are not good for everyone.

First, oat is a grain and thus contains anti-nutrient properties just like other grains, including phytic acid which has been known for stripping your body from absorbing the nutrients in the oats and other foods (zinc, calcium, and iron). Luckily, proper cooking of oats reduces this anti-nutrient.

Second, oat is rich in starch and carbs. Meaning, it can unnecessarily increase your blood sugar level.

Lastly, since oat is a bland food, many people end up adding sweeteners and/or fruit to it, which can further add to blood sugar imbalance, inconsistent energy, and also increase body fat. 

Types of Oats

If you want to eat oats, there are forms that are healthier. You see, oats are available in different forms according to the processing they undergo. The least processed forms take longer to digest, so they have a lower glycemic index (blood sugar measurement) compared to other forms.

  • Oat groats – refer to the dehulled oat grain. They contain the bran, germ, and endosperm. Only the inedible hulls are removed.
  • Oat bran – refer to the outer shell of the oat groat seed.
  • Steel-cut or Irish – oat groats, minus the bran, that has been cut into two or three smaller pieces with a steel blade.
  • Scottish oats – oat groats, without the bran, that has been stone-ground into a meal and yield to a porridge-like texture when cooked.
  • Rolled oats – oat groats, without the bran, that passed through a steam roller and flattened into flakes. Moisture is then removed so they are stable to be stored on the shelf.
  • Quick or instant – oat groats that are steamed for a prolonged period and rolled into thinner pieces. Quick or instant oats are the most processed form, and many brands come sweetened or flavored. 

In summary, the oat bran simply means the outer part of the oat groats, while the oatmeal is the cut, rolled, or instant form of the oat groats. Let’s check out the difference between these two main categories.

Cooking TimeOat bran cooks faster than oatmeal (2-3 mins).

Nutrition 

Oat bran outshines oatmeal nutritionally.

Take a look at the comparison of their nutritional values in the table below (spoiler alert: oat bran is higher in fiber and protein and lower in starch/sugar and calories than oatmeal). 

 100 grams of oat bran100 grams of oatmeal
fiber15.4 grams10.1 grams
protein17.3 grams13.15 grams
sugar1.45 grams0.99 grams
calories246 calories370 calories

Soluble FiberOat brain also contains more beta-glucan, a type of soluble fiber that has many health benefits. Specifically, the beta-glucan found in oats has been proven to improve cholesterol and LDL levels.

Because oat bran is richer in soluble fiber, you will feel fuller after eating a bowl of oat bran, which can last for 4 hours. However, eating a bowl of oatmeal tends to provide less satiety.

Taste and Texture

With taste, both oat bran and oatmeal taste the same. With texture, oat bran is creamy and mushy while oatmeal is chewy. You can bake with either as well.I hope that this newsletter was helpful to you! It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Pros and Cons of Mushroom Coffee

Mushroom coffee isn’t new, but I do get a lot of questions about it, so today I want to shed some light on the pros and cons of mushroom coffee.



Before I do that, I want to make sure that you don’t miss out on my free webinar today. There’s still time to sign up if you want to learn How Stress Wrecks Your Digestion and What You Can Do About It! Click here for details or to register.

What is mushroom coffee?

Mushroom coffee is a growing trend in the modern health food world. Though it’s getting attention recently, people have been consuming mushroom extracts and broths from powdered mushroom species for thousands of years. In traditional Chinese medicine, mushrooms were used as a medicinal food. 

How to make mushroom coffee?

You can’t just toss coffee and mushrooms in a cup and drink it because that would be less than delicious!Mushrooms undergo a thorough drying and extraction process to get the beneficial compounds before it’s added to coffee. The following are the two most common ways to make coffee:

  • Mushroom powder in coffee – Prepare your regular coffee (caffeinated, decaf, half-caf), add a teaspoon of mushroom coffee and mix well to dissolve the mushroom.
  • Mushroom-coffee blend – This comes in a single-serving packet containing pre-measured mushroom powder and instant coffee with the option of containing sweetener and/or creamer.

The most common mushrooms added in coffee blends include:

  • Reishi
  • Chaga
  • Lion’s mane
  • Cordyceps

Regardless of how you would like your mushroom coffee prepared, its growing benefits are truly undeniable. Let’s explore on these benefits:

  • Packed with nutrients – just a teaspoon of mushroom powder in your coffee is equivalent to 2000 mg or 2 g of “functional mushroom” (mushrooms with medicinal or adaptogenic health benefits beyond their nutritional composition) AND provides added nutrition including the low-calorie source of protein, B vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds that support your body’s equilibrium.
  • Supports brain and nerve health – particularly Lion’s mane coffee, the bioactive ingredients of mushrooms support brain health and regulate healthy mood.
  • Supports healthy blood sugar – Try adding maitake mushroom powder to your coffee when you’re eating a high-carb meal. Maitake may lessen the carbohydrates digested and absorbed in the intestines.
  • Helps combat stress – Add reishi powder to your coffee to help you de-stress and prepare you for a good night’s sleep.
  • Promotes healthy gut microbes – A teaspoon of mushroom powder every day adds to your fiber consumption and increases the growth of healthy gut microbes.
  • Provides antioxidants – Chaga, specifically, is rich in antioxidants that prevent tissue damage due to oxidative stress and free radicals.
  • Contains anti-inflammatory compounds – Mushroom coffee supports your body’s natural response to inflammation. It actually contains anti-inflammatory compounds like polysaccharides and carotenoids.
  • Limits cholesterol absorption – In a study among rats, ergosterol, which is found in the cell walls of mushrooms, suppresses the absorption of cholesterol and increases its excretion through the GI tract.
  • Supports healthy immune response –  A teaspoon of turkey tail powder daily activates your immune system.
  • Supports your workout – If you’re looking for something to support your stamina and oxygen capacity and help muscle recovery, then cordyceps mushroom powder is just right for you.

What are the downsides of mushroom coffee?

Not many! Primarily, mushroom coffee should be avoided if you have an allergy or intolerance to mushrooms. Also, certain fungal, yeast imbalances, or mold illness could potentially be worsened by consuming mushrooms so you’d want to check with your practitioner first. Secondly, although mushroom coffee is exciting, the studies on it are limited to test tubes and animals. More human research is still needing to be done. Lastly, which is minor, is the higher cost–functional mushrooms are not commercially farmed but harvested in their natural habitat.

Not a coffee drinker? Me neither! I am a big fan of functional mushrooms though and I consume dandelion tea with mushroom powder (Teeccino is a delicious brand!).

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

The Reward & Procrastination Hormone

Dopamine is a monoamine neurotransmitter and a hormone that is made in your adrenal glands and also released by your brain’s hypothalamus. 

For a long time, dopamine has been known as the “pleasure chemical” and the “feel-good hormone,” sending chemical messages between brain cells in a way that creates the feeling of reward in you for doing an activity. The feeling of pleasure gives you a sense of motivation to seek out for more. But there’s another side to dopamine that you’re about to learn.

As humans, our brains are hard-wired to do things that release dopamine in our reward system. It is in our nature, from the evolutionary standpoint. Our reward system, in which dopamine plays a big role, is designed to reward us for doing things to survive, like eating, drinking, sex, and competing with others to survive. When we do something pleasurable, our brains let out a big hit of dopamine, making us feel good and motivated to do more of the activity that gives us pleasure. This is the very reason why most people get easily addicted to junk food and sugar. Eating these things triggers the brain’s reward system, releasing dopamine and making people feel pleasure and encouraging them to repeat the experience. 

Commercials and marketing can be very effective because they appeal to your internal reward system. Even though you might perfectly know that what is being marketed is really not good for your health, they can trigger desire and cravings. It’s just how our brains work!

However, understanding how your brain works in this way can really help you to seek better alternatives for pleasure and reward. There are plenty of healthy things that come with an inherent rewarding feeling (drinking water when you’re thirsty, taking a shower or hot tub, sleeping when you’re tired, getting a massage or rubbing your own muscles, listening to music) while other activities can be learned to be linked to pleasure like healthy eating, exercising or physical activity, stretching, meditation, and replacing unhealthy foods/drinks with healthy ones. 

Pause and consider some ways you are willing to take action and help your brain reward you for doing helpful and healthy activities for yourself.

Let’s now look a bit more closely at some dopamine research relating to avoidance behavior.

Researchers from the University of Maryland and School of Medicine have found a direct link between dopamine and avoidance (behavior related to pain and fear).

Apparently, we humans get a dopamine reward by avoiding pain and fear. This makes so much sense when you think about why we avoid things that are unknown, or why we might struggle to form new habits we are trying to create, or even why you might be prone to procrastinate…your brain is wired to get a reward by avoiding things that you fear or think could harm you! And the unknown or “new” is considered to be scary (on some level) to your brain.

Consider how you might use this info to your advantage. Not only can you choose to treat yourself with compassion if you are struggling to take on new healthy habits (or keep up with certain habits), but consider how you can bring in some fun and familiarity to reinforce the changes you are trying to make. You might try a “dopamine sandwich” where you do something naturally rewarding right before doing the new “scary” habit and then do something naturally rewarding right after. This will help your brain to associate reward with the new behavior. Visualization can really help with this! You can imagine something really fun–like going on a great vacation, get that dopamine flowing, and then go for a walk or make a delicious and healthy meal (maybe even playing some music while you do this) and then afterward you give yourself a foot massage or listen to some comedy. Use that dopamine so it helps you live your best life! 

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Oat Bran vs Oatmeal: Which is Healthier?

I’m excited to talk about this topic with you today, but before we dig in, I want to make sure that you are aware of a free webinar I am giving next week with Park Avenue Fitness on inflammation. You can view the details and sign up free here.
Okay so let’s talk about oats! Oats, which are formally named Avena sativa, are a gluten-free whole grain from the Poaceae grass family of plants. Well technically, all grains have gluten (a storage protein), but the gluten that everyone talks about as harmful is found in wheat, rye, barley and anything cross-contaminated with these.
While oats have nutritional value, there are a few reasons why oats are not good for everyone.

First, oat is a grain and thus contains anti-nutrient properties just like other grains, including phytic acid which has been known for stripping your body from absorbing the nutrients in the oats and other foods (zinc, calcium, and iron). Luckily, proper cooking of oats reduces this anti-nutrient.

Second, oat is rich in starch and carbs. Meaning, it can unnecessarily increase your blood sugar level.

Lastly, since oat is a bland food, many people end up adding sweeteners and/or fruit to it, which can further add to blood sugar imbalance, inconsistent energy, and also increase body fat. 

Types of Oats

If you want to eat oats, there are forms that are healthier. You see, oats are available in different forms according to the processing they undergo. The least processed forms take longer to digest, so they have a lower glycemic index (blood sugar measurement) compared to other forms.

  • Oat groats – refer to the dehulled oat grain. They contain the bran, germ, and endosperm. Only the inedible hulls are removed.
  • Oat bran – refer to the outer shell of the oat groat seed.
  • Steel-cut or Irish – oat groats, minus the bran, that has been cut into two or three smaller pieces with a steel blade.
  • Scottish oats – oat groats, without the bran, that has been stone-ground into a meal and yield to a porridge-like texture when cooked.
  • Rolled oats – oat groats, without the bran, that passed through a steam roller and flattened into flakes. Moisture is then removed so they are stable to be stored on the shelf.
  • Quick or instant – oat groats that are steamed for a prolonged period and rolled into thinner pieces. Quick or instant oats are the most processed form, and many brands come sweetened or flavored. 

In summary, the oat bran simply means the outer part of the oat groats, while the oatmeal is the cut, rolled, or instant form of the oat groats. Let’s check out the difference between these two main categories.

Cooking Time

Oat bran cooks faster than oatmeal (2-3 mins).

Nutrition 

Oat bran outshines oatmeal nutritionally.

Take a look at the comparison of their nutritional values in the table below (spoiler alert: oat bran is higher in fiber and protein and lower in starch/sugar and calories than oatmeal). 

 100 grams of oat bran100 grams of oatmeal
fiber15.4 grams10.1 grams
protein17.3 grams13.15 grams
sugar1.45 grams0.99 grams
calories246 calories370 calories

Soluble FiberOat brain also contains more beta-glucan, a type of soluble fiber that has many health benefits. Specifically, the beta-glucan found in oats has been proven to improve cholesterol and LDL levels.

Because oat bran is richer in soluble fiber, you will feel fuller after eating a bowl of oat bran, which can last for 4 hours. However, eating a bowl of oatmeal tends to provide less satiety.

Taste and Texture

With taste, both oat bran and oatmeal taste the same. With texture, oat bran is creamy and mushy while oatmeal is chewy. You can bake with either as well.I hope that this newsletter was helpful to you! It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Low-Calorie and Low-Carb Alcoholic Drinks

Alcohol isn’t something that everyone feels compelled to consume. Personally, I don’t like alcohol. I don’t like the taste and I don’t like how it makes me feel, so I don’t drink alcohol almost ever. But I know many people who do enjoy it in moderation. You may drink because you like the taste or because it signals that you are “unwinding” from the stress of the day or because it seems expected in social situations (or because you aren’t comfortable in social situations and drinking alcohol makes you feel more relaxed and outgoing).

I think it is helpful to understand what your intentions are when it comes to eating and drinking so that you can consider your options for meeting your needs and create some alcohol-free options.

When it comes to alcohol, there are some choices that are healthier than others.



In today’s newsletter, let’s discover alcoholic beverages that are low in calories and carbohydrates. But first, let’s define calories and carbohydrates and the difference between the two.

Cals and Carbs

Calorie refers to the measurement of the amount of energy we get from the food and drinks we consume, as well as the energy we use/expend to maintain life and do physical activities. We get calories from three macronutrients namely, fats, proteins, and carbohydrates–which are the building blocks of a balanced diet.

There are 4 calories in every gram of carbohydrate, also 4 calories per gram of protein, and 9 calories per gram of fats. Alcohol is not an essential nutrient, however, it does have a lot of calories–7 calories per gram.Carbohydrates, or carbs, are a macronutrient that includes sugars, starches, and fiber. Arguably, fiber and starch serve a purpose in that they have benefits to our health, whereas sugar does not.

If you are looking to release weight, improve your blood sugar, sleep better, or balance your energy levels, alcohol can certainly get in the way. Here are some examples: Fat metabolism is greatly reduced–up to 73%!–after 2 alcoholic beverages; alcohol stimulates your appetite, increases your stress hormone cortisol, reduces testosterone levels, and increases estrogen by up to 300%! (say hello to belly fat) for up to 24 hrs after drinking. None of that is good!

Drinking alcohol certainly creates some obstacles to good health, especially when we drink often, in excess, and certain types of alcoholic beverages are worse than others. Let’s check out the carb and calorie content of different liquors.

Spirits

Also known as hard alcohol, liquor, or distilled beverages, spirits are carb-free, but their calorie count depends on their alcohol content. Essentially, the more alcohol there is in the beverage, the more calories it contains. Examples of carb-free spirits are vodka, gin, tequila, whiskey, brandy, rum, and cognac.

Beer 

Beer is not a good option if you are on a low-carb diet or are trying to manage diabetes because it has a greater calorie and carb content compared to non-flavored hard alcohol and wine. It’s just like drinking liquid bread! Speaking of which, if you have leaky gut, gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance, regular beer is definitely not a good option.

There is ultralight or low-carb beer (which contains only .5-3 grams of carbs per bottle or can) as well as gluten-free beer options (and some brands like Green’s Trailblazer are very low carb AND gluten-free). Here’s a list of some options.

Wine

The alcohol level of wine ranges between 5.5 to 14.5% with an 11.6% average alcohol by volume. In a 5-ounce serving of dry wine, there are about 3-6 grams of carbs and 110-130 calories. 

If you prefer to drink wine, stick to red or white wines only as they have fewer than 5 grams of net carb per serving. Dessert wines or sweet wines are high in carbs and calories. Also, be cautious of labels. Some brands can play with their labels to give consumers the perception that the beverage has low carb content.
Dry-farm and organic wines tend to be the healthiest options.

Mixed Drinks

Mixed drinks are flavored distilled drinks made from fruits, sugar, spices, or herbs. While their alcohol concentration is quite lower compared to that of unflavored liquor, they are loaded with carbohydrates and sugar!

You may want to create your own cocktails at home rather than buying pre-packaged mixers which are more likely to be high in sugar and calories. And instead of using high-calorie sweeteners or syrups to improve the taste of your drink, try using fresh herbs such as lavender, basil, mint, and rosemary. Add more ice, sparkling water, or seltzer (instead of soda or juice) to change the proportion of your beverage.

hope that you found this newsletter helpful!

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully. 

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!

Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).
 

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca