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The Secret to Healthier Skin

I’m going to make today’s newsletter short and sweet. We’re going to explore something called the gut-skin axis and how you can support BOTH!
 
Sure, there are tons of skin care products on the market, and some of them are undeniably better than others, but none of them are going to override the impact of your primary beauty secret–your gut!
 
Why?
 
Because when your gut is healthy, it shows on the outside in every way, including your skin.

Because your gut is at the root of your health. 



Your gut is where you take all the good stuff you eat and drink and transform it into the many building blocks your body needs to make energy, think clearly, sleep well, maintain a healthy weight, build muscle, fight infections, and clear out toxins that need clearing out daily so you can thrive. Let’s go deeper.
 

The Gut-Skin Axis

The digestive system and the skin have both endocrine, neurological, and immune functions. They are closely related to each other–so close that a number of studies have shown that gut health affects the skin. How do these two organ systems communicate with each other?
 
Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are often accompanied by skin manifestations. When your gut microbiome is not healthy, gaps are created in the intestinal lining where your gut bacteria and their metabolites can escape to the bloodstream. They then accumulate in the skin and disturb its homeostasis, resulting in inflammatory skin conditions such as eczema, acne, psoriasis, and rosacea.
 
We also clear toxins out through our digestive pathways–if not, then they must get out another way and your skin is a major organ of detoxification.

Another way the gut and skin communicate is through their immune function. It’s not only the gut that contains microbes; the skin does too! The skin microbiota maintain skin homeostasis by preventing the growth of pathogenic (disease-causing) microorganisms as well as inflammation.
 
The gut microbes seem to play a role in the health of the skin microbiota. When fiber is fermented in the gut, the gut microbes produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which promote the growth of skin microbes, thereby increasing the skin’s immune function.
 
The relationship between the gut and skin is undeniable. And the secret to healthier skin can be found in your very own kitchen. Feed your gut with fiber and probiotic foods, fresh veggies, and clean protein, and drink plenty of clean, filtered water daily and see for yourself –it’ll show!

It is my passion is to work with people like you whose health symptoms–like low energy, gut/digestive issues, excess weight, mood imbalance, chronic infections, and skin & sleep problems–are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’d like to learn more about how you can discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health
~Rebecca

3 Easy Ways to Fight Holiday Stress

While the holidays can be the best time of the year for some, for others it can feel like the worst. The American Psychological Association has actually found that almost half of women in the US experience heightened stress during this season, putting them at increased health risk.

 

Aside from holiday stress, SAD (seasonal affective disorder) or winter depression can make this time of year challenging.
 
To manage stress, it is common to resort to food and alcohol to manage stress. Self-care and stress-management techniques, on the other hand, can help you stay healthy and feeling like your best self during the holidays.
 
I remember a quote by Katie Reed, a writer, speaker, and mental health advocate. She said, “Self-care is giving the world the best of you, instead of what’s left of you.”
 
This holiday season, let’s work to keep our sanity and our relationships with others as healthy as possible. Here are 3 suggestions:

Don’t Neglect Healthy Habits

No matter what the season, never ever let go of healthy habits because they are the foundation to a healthy and awesome you. Be mindful of your physical activity–make sure you have ample time for movement and exercise every day. Physical activity does not only boost your energy but also elevates your mood. Get enough rest and sleep and eat healthy meals. 
 
Take a break from social media and news, too. Not all news and updates we see online make us happy. You can choose to go offline and spend more time on yourself.
 
Read a book. Take a night stroll. Go stargazing. 
These are all good for your mental health–to free yourself from stressors by doing something nice for yourself, focusing on the moment, and reducing distractions.
 

Take Time to Reflect on the Meaning of the Season

Most people are stressed out by holiday shopping and hopping from one event to another. But instead of doing that, especially right now with the shelter in place orders, I suggest you take some time off to reflect on the true meaning of this season for you–what can you focus on that you enjoy about this time of year? What are the things that you’d actually like to do with your precious time rather than doing things out of obligation? 
 
If you feel overwhelmed with gift shopping, why not prepare something that money can’t buy or donate to a worthy cause on someone’s behalf? If you are stressed by the busyness of your schedule, you could schedule some activities later, like the first week of January.

Reach Out

While some people are overwhelmed with the company of family and relatives during this time, we are being told not to travel right now and not to gather in large groups, so some are spending Christmas and New Year alone. If you are one, don’t hesitate to reach out to someone–a friend, a family, a relative. A letter, a call, a video conference…find a safe way to connect with someone you care about. It’s a win-win.
 
Stressing out about what we don’t have control over, won’t lift anyone’s holiday spirit, so I encourage you to focus on these suggestions instead.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).
Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!

~Rebecca

Simple Tips to Keep Your Gut Happy This Holiday Season

Well, the holiday season is already in full swing even though for many of us it feels very different with the pandemic also in full swing.
 
Though this holiday may look and feel very different than in years past, there’s bound to be celebrations of some kind going on. This usually involves a feast or two and the hustle and bustle of holiday traditions.  That’s why I want to talk to you about how to keep your gut healthy throughout the holidays; because a healthy gut is a happy gut!
 
Your gut is home to countless microbes that are continually doing hard work for you to keep your physical, mental, and emotional health up. But without your help, your gut can’t be at its best.  Putting into practice the tips below will help your gut keep up the good work and allow you to not only enjoy your holiday season more, but allow you to feel good in your skin and step into 2021 feeling great!


 

1. Indulge yourself while taking care of yourself.

 A great way to do this is to upgrade your recipes by swapping out processed, harmful ingredients for higher quality and healthier ones (i.e. swap sugar with one of the countless healthier and delicious options like monk fruit, erythritol, allulose, stevia, xylitol or hybrids such as Lakanto, Pure Cane, Swerve, etc; swap wheat flour or high glycemic flours with coconut, almond, flax, hazelnut, or cassava flours; swap vegetable oil or margarine with avocado oil, olive oil, coconut oil, ghee or butter).
You can also incorporate gut-helping foods into your feasts. For example, you can add a good amount of dietary fiber to your dishes because they are good for gut microbes. Other prebiotic foods include asparagus, carrots, Brussels sprouts, sunchokes, onions, garlic, and nuts.
It can also be great to try new recipes so that you can add more gut-friendly ingredients on your dishes.
 

2. Slow down on alcohol.

If there ever was a holiday people wanted to numb out with alcohol, this is it. But do you really want to add a hangover, extra pounds, and gut inflammation to this extremely difficult year? No thanks! Skip the alcohol or drink small quantities of better quality alcohol like organic wine, gluten-free beer, hard cider, kombucha, etc. Mixed drinks that add a lot of extra sugar make it harder to drink in moderation and add a lot of extra work on your liver (which disrupts your hormones, sleep, mood, waistline, blood sugar, blood pressure…the list goes on and on).
 

3. Maintain a normal sleep routine.

Losing some zzz’s lessens the number of your gut microbes. It doesn’t totally mean that you should avoid evening celebrations, but it’s a great idea to opt for earlier celebrations and dinners whenever possible and keep your later nights to a minimum. 
 

4. Increase your level of serotonin.

This is perhaps the busiest time of the year for most of us–which can definitely be a source of stress. When your stress level increases, your colonic bacteria suffers. On the other hand, when your gut microbes are healthy and balanced, they can help you build resilience against stressful situations. A primary reason for this is because most of your serotonin (aka your happy brain chemical) is made in your gut! You can support your mood and serotonin levels in the following ways: exercise (especially aerobic exercise), getting plenty of sleep, getting outside in the light or getting bright light in the morning/day (if you don’t have much sun this time of year, consider a light box), and eat plenty of protein and nutrient dense carbohydrates (veggies, fruits rather than breads and sweets).
 
I’m sure that by choosing healthier options this holiday season, your gut will thank you, and in the end, it’s you who will benefit from it.
 
It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

Natural Pain Relief for Arthritis

No one likes to be inflamed and in pain, so today I’d like to share some natural therapies for arthritis pain.

There are 2 types of arthritis:

1. Osteoarthritis – caused by the wear-and-tear damage to the cartilage of your bones. Cartilage plays a role in preventing friction during joint movement, so once it is damaged, bone grinding on bone occurs and causes pain on the joint.

2. Rheumatoid arthritis – an autoimmune type, in which the immune system attacks the joint capsule, the membrane enclosing all parts of the joint. This causes inflammation, characterized by pain and swelling.

While there are many medications available for arthritis, you have a choice to opt for natural alternatives. In fact, according to the Arthritis Foundation, there are 8 natural therapies for arthritis pain. I’ll summarize most of them below. Plus, I’ve got a surprise addition to this list!

First, to reduce pressure on your joints, release excess body fat. Just losing one pound relieves your swollen joints from four pounds of pressure. You can achieve this by combining a healthy diet with ample amounts of exercise and physical activity (and yes, if you have arthritis, you will likely need to modify the types of activity you do: yoga, tai chi, qi gong, swimming, and weight training are some great options).

Second, movement should be part of your daily routine.  Performing a low-impact exercise for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. As I mentioned above, both yoga and tai chi are great options. Yoga originated from India while tai chi from China, but both relieve joint pain and stiffness (and are great for reducing stress levels!).

Third, soothe yourself with techniques such as acupuncture, massage, or physical therapy. Acupuncture uses tiny needles inserted through the skin on different acupoints in the body so that your natural painkillers are activated and your nerves, muscles, and connective tissues are stimulated. Massage uses gentle manipulation of the body while applying some sort of pressure. Physical therapy also provides ways to lessen the pressure on swollen joints, to reduce stiffness, and improve movement patterns and mobility.

Fourth, electrical stimulation, also known as TENS (transcutaneous electrical stimulation) can be helpful. To relieve pain, a bit of electrical stimulation is used by applying small electrodes on the affected area. The electromagnetic current from the device is applied to the skin through the electrodes.

Fifth, is the topical CBD cream, such as the Lassen Labs Nano CBD Relief Cream. I’ve gotten great feedback on this product from clients and family members so I definitely recommend checking it out.

As I discussed in a previous newsletter, you have cannabinoid receptors in every part of the body and they help regulate pain and inflammation (amongst other things).

For more info about CBD use for arthritis, read here.

Lastly, the health of your gut makes a big difference! To have strong, healthy joints and a balanced inflammatory response, you need to be properly digesting and absorbing your food and keeping your immune response in check–this all happens in your gut! You’ve heard me say many times that your gut is at the root of all your health. Diet and lifestyle make a HUGE impact on gut health. Eating high quality protein and produce, hydrating, getting at least 7 hrs of sleep per night, exercising and moving your body regularly, spending time in nature, managing stress…these are powerful healthy habits that build the foundation for a healthy gut.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you! Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!

~Rebecca

How CBD Can Help Your Gut

How CBD Can Help Your Gut

You’ve probably heard about something called cannabinoids before, usually in reference to cannabis or marijuana. But did you know that your body produces its own cannabinoids?
 
It’s true! Your body has what’s called an endocannabinoid system–a complex system of naturally produced cannabinoids in the body. These endocannabinoids, as they are called, stimulate the cannabinoid receptors found in the different parts of the body.
 
The endocannabinoid system is involved in a lot of your body processes such as appetite, digestion, mood, the sensation of pain, inflammation, and even your memory.


 
When you take a cannabinoid such as the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC or cannabidiol (CBD), they fit into your cannabinoid receptors and affect the level of your neurotransmitters which ultimately affects how your brain cells communicate with each other. But as I mentioned, your own body makes cannabinoids–endo, means made within, hence the name endocannabinoid. Your brain makes these cannabinoids and they circulate throughout your body and attach to receptors to help your body in some way. Let’s explore how.

CBD and Digestion

Can CBD (derived from the hemp plant) help with digestion? Yes. Many researchers believe that the ECS (endocannabinoid system) is the link in the brain-gut axis. It allows communication between the central nervous system (CNS) and the enteric nervous system (ENS).  The CNS is your brain and spinal cord while your ENS runs from your esophagus to your rectum. Both of them speak the same language, using the same receptors, neurons, and neurotransmitters.
 
Moreover, cannabinoid receptors are found in the entire GI tract. These systems work together closely.
 
In summary, the ECS affects your gut in three major ways:

  • Modulate inflammation–The cannabinoid receptors, when stimulated by certain cannabinoids, help in protecting the gut from inflammation.
  • Regulates digestive action–Proper gut motility ensures all food is digested and nutrients are well absorbed. Cannabinoids found in plants can stimulate the cannabinoid receptors so that nausea and vomiting are prevented. This calms the stomach and even decreases excess stomach acid. Much of the research shows that the endocannabinoid system regulates nausea and vomiting in humans and other animals.
  • Regulates communication to your brain–As I mentioned earlier, the ECS links the brain and gut. When you are stressed or in pain, this alters your digestive function. When you have GI problems, this is communicated back to the brain.

4 Ways to Support your ECS

To support your ECS for gut health, take these tips into consideration:

  1. Manage your stress. Although it’s the ECS that helps regulate your stress response, chronic stress will deplete the ability of your ECS to do so. So take it easy. Make sure you have time to relax, rest, and recuperate. HeartMath, meditation, tai chi, yoga, and breathing exercises are all great ways to support your ECS.
  2. Limit alcohol consumption. Heavy drinking of alcohol definitely impairs the ability of your cannabinoid receptors to process cannabinoids.
  3. Eat dietary cannabinoids. These are found in cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage. Fatty fish, nuts, and seeds also contain fatty acids–like Omega 3 fatty acids–that are building blocks for endocannabinoids. Herbs and spices such as rosemary, black pepper, clove, and basil, are good sources, too!
  4. Take a CBD supplement. CBD is a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. CBD oil is natural and non-harmful. Thus you can use it for the long-term. You can check out the many health benefits of CBD oil by following this link.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca

How You Prep Your Veggies Can Boost Nutrients

How You Prep Your Veggies Can Boost Nutrients

Did you know that how you prepare your vegetables determines how available the nutrients in them are to your body?


 
It’s true! This is due to the way sulforaphane is formed.
 
But what is sulforaphane?
 
Sulforaphane is a sulfur-rich compound found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, bok choy, cabbage, arugula, cauliflower, and Brussel sprouts. It has powerful health benefits–one of which is to help detoxify the body and even help in the prevention and treatment of cancer.
 
Sulforaphane, however, is only formed when its precursor–glucoraphanin–mixes with the enzyme myrosinase.
 
Myrosinase is released from the vegetable when you chew, chop, or cut it. The only thing is–myrosinase is destroyed by heat, and without myrosinase, there is no sulforaphane.
 
The good news is that glucoraphanin, the precursor, and sulforaphane itself are resistant to heat so they are not destroyed in the process of cooking.
 
Now, we can do a few things to help boost sulforaphane before myrosinase is formed.
 

Have you heard of the “hack and hold” technique?

This is how you do it: Just cut or chop the veggies first and wait for about 40 minutes before cooking them. Cutting or chopping releases the myrosinase and 40 minutes is enough time to mix it with glucoraphanin and form sulforaphane.
 
Since sulforaphane is already formed, you no longer need myrosinase, thus you can cook the veggies the way you want it or how long you want it.
 
But what if you’re using frozen veggies? Well, frozen ones, such as frozen broccoli, no longer have their myrosinase enzyme. This is because the vegetables are blanched first before they are frozen to destroy the enzymes and prolong their shelf life. Good thing, though, that they still have the precursor (since the precursor is heat resistant).
 
So what can you do to boost the nutrients in frozen veggies?
 
Since myrosinase is found in all cruciferous vegetables, we can use the enzyme to add to frozen veggies. One of the best sources of the enzyme is mustard seed powder. Researchers found out that it significantly increases the amount of sulforaphane in boiled broccoli so that it’s like eating the broccoli raw!
 
So whenever you prepare your cruciferous vegetables, don’t forget to help form sulforaphane: Do the “hack and hold” or add some mustard seed powder.
 
It’s nice to enjoy your food knowing that you’re getting all the health benefits it can give.
 
It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!

~Rebecca

Is Calcium Supplementation Safe?

Is Calcium Supplementation Safe? 

Did you know that 54 million U.S. adults age 50 and older have osteoporosis and bone loss? Women are more likely than men to experience bone loss. When a woman reaches menopause, she becomes at risk of developing osteoporosis due to the rapid bone loss during and about 5-10 years after menopause.
 
Given this, many women have resorted to taking calcium supplements, not knowing that this may do more harm than good.


 
Estrogen enhances calcium absorption in the bones and prevents the excessive breakdown of bone tissues (bone resorption), so when the production of estrogen stops, as in during menopause, bone loss occurs.
 
So, it’s really not the lack of calcium that is the problem, rather its absorption and bone resorption due to low estrogen levels.
 
This is an important point that not many practitioners are talking about. Calcium supplementation is one of the main recommendations given to people, especially women, if they show bone loss on a scan.
 
However, studies support that calcium supplements increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases, being associated with cases of heart attack, stroke, and risk of death. Moreover, cancer and kidney stones were reported to develop among men and women who took calcium supplements.

Calcium supplements are not universally safe. They may even increase your risk of developing, instead of preventing, osteoporosis. And since calcium from supplements gets absorbed easily, it can be deposited in your soft tissues, not in your bones. So it’s actually not doing what you’re thinking it’s supposed to do.

Diet & Lifestyle Tips for Strong Bones

 The good news is that dietary calcium, calcium from food rather than a pill, does increase bone density and prevent osteoporosis. It turns out that since food is absorbed gradually, unlike calcium supplements, it is a more bioavailable form.
 
Here are some calcium-rich foods:

  • Dairy products
  • Leafy vegetables
  • Cruciferous vegetables
  • Seeds and almonds
  • Sardines and canned salmon (with the bones)

 
Aside from food, make sure to do weight-bearing exercises or activities at least twice a week to increase your bone density. These are activities that force you to work against gravity, such as walking, jogging, and climbing. Tai chi and yoga also benefit bone density.
 
It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!

~Rebecca

7 Herbs and Spices that Boost Gut Health

Your gut microbiome plays an important role in keeping your immune system healthy as well as in managing your mood.

Eating the right diet is essential for keeping the microorganisms that make up your microbiome healthy and happy. Foods that keep the gut lining intact and help in the proper movement of food through your digestive tract are necessary to keep your gut healthy.

Today I’ll share with you 7 herbs and spices that boost gut health.

Ginger

Ginger is famous for its culinary value and use in folk medicine. Ginger stimulates the migrating motor complex, the movement of the smooth muscles of the digestive tract that propels residual food forward. Without the migrating motor complex, food sits in your gut and ferments…and eventually causes bloating, gas, and stomach aches.

Ginger also promotes tissue repair in the gut lining and prevents symptoms of inflammatory conditions. In addition, ginger protects the liver from alcohol-induced damage. Most importantly, ginger feeds the beneficial bacteria in your gut!

Try this yummy recipe of ginger beef to help you kickstart a diet with more ginger (can substitute for other proteins if you don’t eat beef).
 
Turmeric


Turmeric is a natural carminative–meaning, it relieves flatulence. As early as 600BC, people already used turmeric for its medicinal properties. It helps in preventing indigestion and inflammation so that incorporating turmeric in your diet can be part of an approach to preventing leaky gut from happening.

Check out the 37 turmeric recipes for vegetables, meats, and more. Turmeric supplements can be hard to digest so using the spice in your cooking is a great way to access its health benefits.

Dandelion

Dandelion is not your ordinary flower. This plant is considered as an herb because all of its parts are used for medicinal purposes. The roots are rich in a soluble fiber and prebiotic called inulin–making it suitable to ease constipation and to nourish the gut microbiome.

Dried dandelion roots make a great tea. You can also mix dandelion greens with other greens for an even healthier salad.

Parsley

Parsley also holds a lot of powerful health benefits for the gut. Adding some parsley in your daily meals could help prevent indigestion and gas. Parsley is pretty versatile. Use it in your salad, soup, stews, garnish, and more to give your gut a health boost.

Basil

Basil leaves, interestingly, have a lot of gut benefits. It has been actually used in traditional medicine to treat indigestion, bloating, and water retention. But above all, basil leaves feed the healthy bacteria in your gut.

Chamomile

Aside from the calming effect of chamomile tea, it is also good for the gut. It has been used to comfort upset stomachs, indigestion, and abdominal gas.

Chamomile tea comes from the dried chamomile flowers and contains flavanoids and antioxidants that make it an ideal herbal remedy.
 
Bay Leaf


Bay leaf is an aromatic leaf famous in the culinary world, but it is also effective in the relief of indigestion. It also helps in decreasing our bodies’ level of toxicity and soothes symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

You can use bay leaf in pickling, marinating, and adding flavor to your dishes. I love to use it in soups, chili, and spaghetti sauce! Check out different bay leaf recipes here.

So I hope you will use this information to make your meals both delicious and gut healing.

It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.

If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!
~Rebecca


How to protect your cells & boost immunity!

Glutathione is your body’s master antioxidant and detoxifier of cells. This means glutathione prevents damage to your cells brought by free radicals (unstable molecules that damage healthy cells). Glutathione also boosts your immune system.  Having the right amount of glutathione helps protect you from disease and infection.
 
Luckily, your body actually produces its own glutathione supply. Your cells produce glutathione from protein building blocks, namely cysteine, glutamine, and glycine.


 
Every cell of your body has glutathione, but it is much more concentrated in the liver because this is where most of the detoxification process occurs.
 
Unfortunately, your glutathione supply can be depleted by poor diet, pollution, toxins from the products we use, medications, stress, trauma, aging, infections, and radiation.
 
If you are prone to infections or anemia and feel sluggish and tired, chances are you have low glutathione levels. 

So how do we amp up glutathione in our body?

 Here are some tips:

  • Get enough sleep – Oftentimes we ignore getting enough sleep but it always backfires on your health. Lack of sleep leads to oxidative stress (cell aging and damage), hormonal imbalance and depleted glutathione levels.
  • Exercise regularly – Exercise is no surprise tip as we have been talking about its health benefits countless times, but a combination of cardio and circuit weight training has been proven effective to increase the body’s glutathione levels. Find that “Goldilock’s spot” for you when it comes to working out so that you aren’t overdoing it and causing fatigue.
  • Use milk thistle oil – Milk thistle is an herb that has been known as a natural remedy for problems in the liver. There are other food and food supplements that can be taken to increase glutathione levels but milk thistle stands out. According to The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, milk thistle is able to increase glutathione levels in the liver up to 35%! The higher the glutathione in the liver is, the greater the ability of the liver to detoxify your body!
  • Unfortunately, though, the body has a hard time absorbing milk thistle supplements. Alternatively, you can eat the plant itself, use it for tea, or take milk thistle oil.
  • Eat foods that boost glutathione production – So in addition to milk thistle, you can add to your diet foods that are high in selenium, sulfur, vitamin C, vitamin E, and alpha-lipoic acid. Eggs and dairy, especially whey protein, and spices like turmeric are also great.

 It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!

~Rebecca

How to Manage Eczema With Diet

Eczema is a skin condition caused by an overactive immune system. The skin gets patches of itchy, red inflammation. The patches can get rough, flaky and even blistery.


Many people who have eczema also have food allergies and/or sensitivities. (Learn more about the difference here.)
 
About 30% of children below 5 years old who are suffering from eczema have at least one food allergy. Interestingly, having eczema also increases your risk of developing food allergies. How does this happen? Researchers aren’t totally sure, but I believe that it is through the gut-skin connection. Everything links back to the health of your gut because of the diversity of bacteria we have there and because it is where both the immune response and inflammatory response largely reside.
 
Even if you don’t have food allergies, there are foods that worsen eczema and lead to outbreaks.
 
If you have eczema, the food that you eat might just be the key to either healing you or intensifying your symptoms.
 
So what are the foods that you should be including in your meals?
 
Anti-inflammatory foods!
 
Now you’ve heard me say a million times that one-size-doesn’t-fit-all! So I’m going to share some examples with you of some foods that can be great for managing inflammation, but that doesn’t mean that they will be a magic fix for YOU. I’m a proponent of testing & customizing! That being said, here are some great places to start.1. Fatty fish — What’s in fatty fish? Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 has powerful anti-inflammatory properties. Salmon, sardines, and mackerel are good choices.
2. Quercetin-rich foods —  Quercetin is one of the most common antioxidants found in plants. It is a natural pigment classified as flavanoids that gives plants their vibrant color. Its antioxidant properties can combat inflammation and symptoms of allergies.

 Foods that contain quercetin are as follows:                      

  • Onions
  • Apples
  • Grapes
  • Berries
  • Broccoli
  • Citrus Fruits

3. Foods with probiotics — Eczema is linked to a dysfunction of the immune system and characterized by inflammation. Some researchers say that eczema starts in the gut.  Your gut is home to millions of helpful microorganisms that keep your gut healthy, and the gut is an extension of the immune system. Thus, when your microbiome in the gut is out of balance, your immune system also starts to behave abnormally.

According to research, people with eczema have less diverse bacteria in their gut microbiome than people who don’t have the condition. That’s likely why probiotics are able to help!
 
Probiotics are live microorganisms found in foods like yogurt, kefir, fermented foods like sauerkraut and fermented pickles, etc. When ingested, they are added to the microorganisms in your gut and help it function optimally (but they don’t live forever and need to be replaced regularly).
 
On the other side, here are some foods that are likely to make your symptoms worse:

  • Food high in preservatives — Since eczema can be triggered with chemical substances, it is best to avoid eating processed foods and fast food. These are full of preservatives, artificial ingredients, and trans fats that flare up the inflammatory response.
  • Sugar-rich foods — Eating lots of sweets can cause your insulin level to go up and this leads to inflammation. If you are craving sweets, that’s a big clue that something needs adjusting in your meal (often, we need more protein to balance our mood and level out cravings, but stress and other feelings can lead to cravings as well).
  • Dairy products and other foods that commonly cause allergy — In addition to dairy products, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, nuts, and citrus (and foods with these ingredients) are common triggers. You can avoid them and see if it helps your skin clear up or there are testing options available if you’d rather go that route.

 Overall, what you eat is important on all levels! Today we looked at the link between diet and eczema and some things that you can apply to reduce your inflammatory response.
 
It is my passion to work with people like you whose health symptoms are getting in the way of you living life fully and with a sense of freedom in your body. I can help you to regain your health so you can feel great and free to enjoy life fully.
 
If you’re ready to discover where your best health has been hiding, I’d love to connect with you!
Apply for a complimentary Unstoppable Health Discovery Session. http://bit.ly/schedulinghealth (subject to availability).

Until next time, I’m wishing you unstoppable health!~Rebecca