Grass-fed Butter

Mmmm, butter. It’s good for all occasions. Know what makes butter even better? When it’s made from cows that have been munching on fresh green grass!
What makes grass-fed butter better?
When cows feast on grass, the cream that they produce is richer in the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K (specificslly Vit K2 which cows convert from the Vit K1 in grass) as well as CLA (conjugated linoleic acid). The benefit of these nutrients is vast–healthier immune system, greater antioxidant protection, improved nervous system function, improved metabolic function, protection against cancer, stronger bones, and even a stronger sex drive (all that good fat contributes to proper hormone production). Plus, grass-fed butter is darn tasty.

Besides all those health benefits, grass-fed butter doesn’t have the problems associated with commercial butter like hormones and antibiotics. Cows fed on pasture, their intended diet, are as a general rule much healthier than their grain/corn/soy-fed counterparts. Therefore, antibiotics are the exception rather than the norm…and they aren’t given hormones either (which disrupt our hormone levels when ingested regularly).

Brands of grass-fed butter

Probably the best butter I’ve tasted is PastureLand sold at www.grasslandbeef.com

Other great brands are Organic Valley (their “pastured” butter sold in the green foil) and Kerrygold IrishButter.

If you like raw butter (kinda tastes like butter with parmesan cheese mixed in), Organic Pastures has a grass-fed raw butter that will knock your socks off!

Whatever brand you choose, do make an effort to eat grass-fed butter instead of plain old organic butter. Your health is worth it! 🙂

Cooking Non-Traditional Breakfasts with Rebecca & Holly, Part 1: Protein Pancakes!

Check out our cooking video on YouTube!

Quick and Easy Protein Pancake Ingredients:

1 cup almond meal or flour (we used Trader Joe’s “Just Almond Meal”)

2 duck eggs (or 3 chicken eggs)

3 tbs coconut oil, melted – 2 in the batter and 1 on the pan (preferably unrefined from a glass jar)

Dash of sea salt

Blend all ingredients together and spoon onto a low/medium pan, cook each side for about 2 minutes or until golden brown.

Yields about 6 small pancakes (about 2 servings).

Topping Options: grass fed butter, grade B maple syrup, fruit, cinnamon, nuts, peanut butter, jam

This is a great healthy breakfast because it’s quick and each serving (about 3 pancakes) has about 24 grams of protein. This is a nice high amount that’s great for stabilizing blood sugar.

Stabilizing blood sugar helps support energy, mood, adrenal function, weight loss, and healthy digestion.

Like I said in the video, for people who need more protein and fat this is a great meal. For those who do well with carbs, adding syrup or fruit is a great way to sweeten up this dish.

Since this meal is gluten free and dairy free, I recommend it for many of my patients who are sensitive to these foods.  Additionally, using duck eggs is helpful for those who may not tolerate chicken eggs.

Nutrition Facts:

1/4 cup almond meal contains:

15 grams fat

5 grams carbohydrates

3 grams fiber

1 grams sugar

7 grams protein

1 duck egg contains:

9.6 grams fat

1 gram carbohydrate

9 grams protein

Stay tuned for our next video – Non-Traditional Breakfasts Part 2!

Quick and Easy Protein Pancake Ingredients:

1 cup almond meal or flour (we used Trader Joe’s “Just Almond Meal”)

2 duck eggs (or 3 chicken eggs)

3 tbs coconut oil, melted – 2 in the batter and 1 on the pan (preferably unrefined from a glass jar)

Dash of sea salt

Blend all ingredients together and spoon onto a low/medium pan, cook each side for about 2 minutes or until golden brown.

Yields about 6 small pancakes (about 2 servings).

Topping Options: grass fed butter, grade B maple syrup, fruit, cinnamon, nuts, peanut butter, jam, cinnamon

This is a great healthy breakfast because it’s quick and each serving (about 3 pancakes) has about 24 grams of protein. This is a nice high amount that’s great for stabilizing blood sugar.

Stabilizing blood sugar helps support energy, mood, adrenal function, weight loss, and healthy digestion.

Like Rebecca said in the video, for people who need more protein and fat this is a great meal. For those who do well with carbs, adding syrup or fruit is a great way to sweeten up this dish.

Since this meal is gluten free and dairy free, I recommend it for many of my patients who are sensitive to these foods.  Additionally, using duck eggs is helpful for those who may not tolerate chicken eggs.

Nutrition Facts:

1/4 cup almond meal contains:

15 grams fat

5 grams carbohydrates

3 grams fiber

1 grams sugar

7 grams protein

1 duck egg contains:

9.6 grams fat

1 gram carbohydrate

9 grams protein

Stay tuned for our next video – Non-Traditional Breakfasts Part 2!

Essential Fatty Acid Misnomer

As I’m laying on the floor of my office doing a posture stretch and listening to my favorite podcast, Underground Wellness, it occurs to me that the term “essential fatty acid” is a misnomer.
We call Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats “essential’ because our bodies cannot make them: we have to obtain them from food. Ironically, most people have far more Omega-6 fats in their diet than is healthy (since corn and soy are in EVERYTHING).
Moreover, saturated fats, which are absolutely essential to our health are vilified. Saturated fats are required for building healthy cell walls and regulating both hormones and enzymes (which effects almost every bodily process)…they are so important that if we overdue eating carbs and sugar, our liver will actually make saturated fat to try and protect us.
So next time you hear the term essential fats, give a shout out of thanks to saturated fat, our under-appreciated friend. 🙂